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Rapier Loom is Rapier Weaving Machine for Textile Industry
Rapier Loom Machine

What is Rapier Loom Weaving Machine of Textile Industry?

Rapier Loom is Rapier Weaving Machine

Rapier loom making a loom in weaving machine using rapier which is flexible for carrying the weft yarn across through the shed. After reaching the destination, the rapier head returns empty to pick up the next weft yarn. One side of a rapier machine, a rod or steel tape, carries the weft yarn for making a loom. The other side of the rapier is connected to the control system.

Types of looms for Textile Weaving

There are two different types of Rapier Loom for textile weaving–

  • Single Rapier Machines for textile weaving
  • Double Rapier Machines  for textile weaving [2]

Single Rapier Machines

A single rapier use rigid rapier. The rigid rapier is metal with a circular cross section.

high speed rapier loom
Single Rapier Loom

The rapier enters the shed from one side, picks up the tip of the installing yarn on the other side which passes it across the power loom width during retracting. As a result, a single rapier carries the yarn in one way. [2]

Double Rapier Machines

There are two rapiers use in these machines where one rapier called the giver that takes the filling yarn from the yarn on one side of the loom, brings it to the middle of the machine and shift it to the second rapier which is called the taker. The taker retards and brings the filling yarn to the another side.[2]

Specifications of Rapier Weaving Machine

Specification of rapier weaving machine is given below –

[label type=”label” title=”Specifications Name“][label type=”label” title=”Specifications Value“]
Product CategoryWeaving machine
Machine CategoryLoom rapier weaving machine
Product NameRapier Loom Machine
Product ModelAccording to Manufacturer
Product ClassNew
OriginChina/India/Others
Brand/ManufacturerName of Manufacturer
Agent In BangladeshNo/Yes
Power1.5~2.2kw
TemperatureNormal
CertificationSGS/Others
Production Capacity100 Set/Sets per Month
Fidder6/8
Droppers10000pcs
Work Width2300 (mm)
Warp Beam Diameter600mm
Drum Diameter300mm
Maximum Speed280rpm
Weft Insertion160-180m/min
Color Selection6 color
Spindle Number392
Heald Frame14
Motor Power1.5 /2.0 Kw
Dimension4450*2300*3100mm
Weight3600kg
DescriptionThe rapier transfer box build with the most helix gears is stable and dependable. Rear beam tension structure is used to balance tension of warp for high density fabrics

Auto Textiles Industry   

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Weaving fabric Defect Manual

There are obviously many other problems that one may encounter during the course of weaving fabric production. However, what were discussed here are considered to be the most common problems or defects that can appear on the weaving fabric .

The explanations and definitions are stated in a general form. But if required, additional expansive and detailed information is available.

It is important to realize that in order to be able to effectively deal with weaving fabric defects, the ability to identify and establish the causes is the first step in determining the corrective or preventive actions.

It is, therefore, essential for the quality control personnel in any weaving fabric producing facility to be mindful, aware and have a complete understanding of the possible problems that might arise.

The quality control procedures must be designed and used first as prevention tools and then, if required, be utilized to correct the defects.

DefectRequirement
BarreIn weaving knits, patterned unevenness of appearance in the course or widthwise direction of a weaving fabric
Bad PlaceIn wovens, localized places where the weave has been severely disrupted
BiasIn wovens, where the filling textile yarns are off-square to the warp ends, in weaving knits, where the course are off-square to the wales
BirdseyeIn weaving knits, the occasional and erratic appearance of tucked stitches contrary to the design of the weaving fabric
BowIn wovens, where the filling textile yarns lie in an arc across the width of the weaving fabric , in weaving knits, where the courses lie in an arc across the width of the weaving fabric
Broken EndWhere a wrap textile yarn has ruptured and been repaired
Broken Colour PatternIn wovens, a break in the continuity of design. In weaving knits, the result of a mistake in creeling
Broken PickWhere a filling break leaves a pick missing for a portion of the width of the weaving fabric
BruiseWhere the textile yarn being woven or the weaving fabric after being woven has been scuffed so as t o disorient the fiber and result in a fuzzy appearance
Burl MarkA distortion resulting from some superfluous material being removed with a burling tool
Buttonhole SelvageA selvage defect caused by excessive tension buildup in the shuttle just before filling change. Resulting in a defect resembling a buttonhole
Chafed Textile yarnTextile yarn that has been scuffed by a abrasion, disorienting the fiber and leaving the textile yarn fuzzy
Chopped FillingAn unevenness in the filling direction characterized by a distinct or measured pattern
Clip MarkAn undyed place resulting from a metal clip being used on edge of a weaving fabric to prevent or correct a selvage turndown during dyeing
Coarse EndAn end whose diameter is noticeably greater than that normal to the weaving fabric
Coarse PickA pick of filling whose diameter is noticeably greater than that normal to the weaving fabric
Coarse Textile yarnA textile yarn whose diameter is noticeably greater than that normal to the weaving fabric
Cockled Weaving fabricIn weaving knits, crinkled, shriveled or ridgy weaving fabric that will not lie flat on the cutting table.
Cockled Textile yarnA textile yarn in which some fiber appear wild or tightly curled and disoriented.
Colour FlyFiber of a different colour appearing in a textile yarn or weaving fabric as contamination
Colour OutIn print , when colour paste runs low in the reservoir resulting in blank skips in the print pattern
Colour SmearIn print , when the colour is smeared, distorting the pattern
Compactor CreaseIn weaving knits, hardset creases resulting from the introduction of wrinkled weaving fabric into the shrinkage control and stabilization process
CorrugationA washboard effect resulting from a malfunctioning sanforizer blanket
CoverThe face of a weaving fabric in relation to amount of warp of filling show
CreaseA place where a weaving fabric has been folder on itself under pressure
Crease StreakThe visual after-effect of a crease occurring during the dyeing or finishing processes
DamagedThe Condition of a weaving fabric rendered unusable for this intended use
Doctor StreakIn prints, a narrow, oscillation length-wise streak
Double EndTwo ends where only one is called for by the design of the weaving fabric
Double PickTwo Picks in a single shed where only one is called for by the design of the weaving fabric
DoublingA filling textile yarn twice the normal size due to two ends of roving running together into a single end of spinning
DrawbackA defect resulting from excessive tension gradually applied to a number of warp textile yarns by some abnormal restriction
Dropped PickThis is the result of the filling insertion mechanism on a shuttleless rapier loom not holding and releasing the filling textile yarn too soon
Dropped StitchIn weaving knits, where a stitch has not formed due to malfunction of a loom needle
Dye Streak in PrintStreaks related to dyestuff, if application to, or absorption by the weaving fabric
End OutA missing warp textile yarn
Filling BandA visually perceptible band across the width of the weaving fabric directly attributable to a difference in the chemical or physical characteristics of the filling
Filling FloatsPicks of filling extending unbound over or under warp ends with which they should have been interlaced
Fine EndAn end whose diameter is noticeably smaller than that normal to the weaving fabric
Fine PickA pick of filling whose diameter is noticeably smaller than that normal to the weaving fabric
Fine Textile yarnIn weaving knits, a textile yarn whose diameter is noticeably smaller than that normal to the weaving fabric
FlatA misdraw in a plain weave resulting in two ends weaving as one and opposing two other ends weaving as one
FloatA thread extending unbound over or under threads of the opposite textile yarn system with which it should have been interlaced
Foreign FiberFiber, other than that common to a weaving fabric , existing as contamination,
Fuzz BallsBalls of fiber encircling the warp textile yarn formed by the abrasion of the rapier loom
GoutAn accumulation of short fiber or fly spun knot the textile yarn or drawn into the rapier loom shed
HaloA light place encircling a defect resulting from dye migration to the defect during drying
Hang PickA pick of filling hanging for a split second on a warp knot or other protrusion until freed by the stroke of the reed
Hang ThreadA thread left hanging on the face of a weaving fabric
Hard SizeA place in a weaving fabric characterized by a harsh, stiff hand and cloudy, uneven appearance
Harness BalkAn isolated failure of a rapier loom harness to move in its prescribed sequence
Harness BreakdownA place where a harness ceases to function
Harness MisdrawWhere one of more ends are drawn through the harness contrary to the design of the weave
HoleSelf Descriptive
Jerk-inAn extra pieced of filling textile yarn jerked by the shuttle into the weaving fabric along with a regular pick of filling
Kinky FillingA place in a weaving fabric where a pick of filling has been given enough slack to twist on itself for a short distance
KnotA place where two ends of textile yarn have been tied together
Rapier loom BarA change in shade across the width of a weaving fabric
Rapier loom WasteA place in a weaving fabric where accumulated waste off the rapier loom has found its way into the weaving fabric either by air current or rapier loom shuttle
Loopy FillingA pick of filling hanging for a split second on a warp knot or other protrusion until freed by the stroke of the reed
Loose CourseIn weaving knits, a course whose loops are more extended than normal
Weaving machine StopVisible evidence of a weaving fabric having been stopped in some weaving machine during the dyeing and finishing process.
Mat-upA place where the warp textile yarns have become entangled so as to disrupt the proper interlacing of warp and filling
Misdraw(Harness)Where one or more ends are drawn through the harness contrary to the design of the weave
Misdraw(Reed)Where one or more ends are   drawn through the reed contrary to the design
Misdraw(Colour )In wovens, the drawing of colour ed textile yarns through the rapier loom harness contrary to the colour pattern and/ or weave design.
MispickWhere the weave design is broken by the absence of a pick of filling
Missing Textile yarnIn weaving knits, the absence of a textile yarn
Miss-selectionIn weaving knits, where the design is corrupted by the random dropping of stitches
Mixed FillingA visible widthwise band resulting from filling that differs from that normal to the weaving fabric
Mixed Textile yarnTextile yarn that is alien to a weaving fabric because of its peculiar chemical or physical characteristics
MottledA term used to describe a blotch or spotty appearance
Loom needle LineIn weaving knits, a vertical crack resulting from a bent loom needle
NeppinessAn excessive amount of tangled masses of fiber (neps) appearing on the face of a weaving fabric
Open ReedA defect resulting from defect resulting from a bent reed wire, characterized by a fine-lined thin place in the warp direction
Out of RegisterIn print , pattern distortion due to the lack of synchronization of the print rolls
OvershotA pick of filling deflected from its normal path through the shed and extending unbound over warp ends with
Pattern DefectIn wovens, the formation of interlaces or the insertion of colour contrary to the design of the weaving fabric
Pin HolesThese are holes common to a weaving fabric run over a pin-tenter and become a defect when they venture too far in from the selvage and enlarge to tear
Press OffIn weaving knits, a condition where the weaving fabric fails to knit and either falls off the weaving machine or the design is completely disrupter and destroyed
PuckerA warpwise distortion resulting from uneven wetting out during sanforization
Reed MisdrawWhere one or more ends are drawn through the reed contrary to design
Reed MarkA defect resulting from a bent reed wire, characterized by a fine-lined thin place in the warp direction
ReedyA condition characterized by open streaks following the pattern of the reed wires
RoughA term used to describe a rough or crinkled appearance
RunIn weaving knits, a vertical line of unformed stitches resulting from a broken loom needle or jack
Sanforize CorrugationA washboard effect resulting from a malfunctioning sanforizer blanket
Sanforize PuckerA warpwise distortion resulting from uneven wetting out during sanforization
Sanforize RoughnessA term used to describe a rough or crinkled appearance
ScrimpA defect resulting from a weaving fabric being printed in a folded or creased condition
Seam ImpressionThe imprint of a seam made under pressure
Selvage (Beaded)A term used to describe a selvage that has concentration of ends drawn together forming a cord or bead
Selvage (Scalloped)An unevenness characterized by a regularity of ins and outs
Selvage (Slack or Wavy)The condition where the edge of a weaving fabric is longer than the center
Selvage (Tight)The condition where the selvages of a weaving fabric are shorter than the center
Selvage (Turndown)A place where a selvage folds on itself and runs through squeeze rolls setting the fold
Shade BarA distinct shade change of short duration across the width of the weaving fabric
Shade ChangeA term used to describe a general change in shade, either abrupt or gradual, that is not confined to, or cannot be described as, shade-bars
Shade (Cross)Where there is a noticeable shade difference from one side of a weaving fabric to the other
Shade (Side to Center)Where there is a noticeable shade difference from the side of a weaving fabric to the center
Shed-splittingA term used to describe multiple textile yarn floats
Shuttle MarkA fine line parallel to the filling
SinglingA single textile yarn appearing in a plied-textile yarn weaving fabric
SkewIn wovens, where the filling textile yarns are off square to the warp ends, in weaving knits, where the courses are off square to the wales
Skip stitchIn weaving knits, the wrong formation of the knit design
Slack EndThe result of a loose or broken end puckering as it is gradually woven into a weaving fabric
Slack WarpA weaving fabric woven with less than required tension
Sloughed FillingA defect caused by extra winds of filling slipping from the bobbin and being woven into the weaving fabric
SlubA term used to describe a short thick place in a textile yarn
Slubby FillingA bobbin of filing containing numerous slubs
Sluggy FillingA bobbin of filling containing numerous gouts or slugs of waste fiber
SmashA place in a weaving fabric where a large number of wrap ends have been ruptured and repaired
SnapIn print , the result of a hard particle becoming lodged under a doctor blade, holding the blade from the engraved roll, allowing colour to escape on either side of the particle
Soiled EndA warp textile yarn that has been soiled by grease or dirt
Soiling FillingFilling textile yarn that has been soiled by grease or dirt
SpotA discolour ed place or stain on a weaving fabric
Stop MarkIn wovens, a defect resulting from the warp textile yarn elongation under tension while a rapier loom is stopped. In weaving knits, a similar distortion resulting from the relaxation of the textile yarns during a weaving machine stop
Straying EndIn warp weaving knits, the result of a broken end straying out of position and being knitted in a irregular manner into the weaving fabric as the weaving machine continues to run
StreakSee crease, reed, dye
Temple BruiseA streak along the edge of a weaving fabric that has been scuffed and/or distorted by a damaged malfunctioning of poorly set temple
Thick PlaceA place across the width containing more picks or heavier filling than that normal to the weaving fabric
Thin PlaceA place across the width containing less picks or lighter filling than that normal to the weaving fabric
Tight EndIn wovens, an end running taut due to some abnormal restriction. In warp weaving knits, a tight end will cause a fine lined, length or warpwise distortion in the weaving fabric
Trapped ShuttleThe effect is that of distorting the weaving fabric and stretching the textile yarn
Tucking DefectIn weaving knits, when the tuck stitch is unintentional and contrary to the design of the weaving fabric
UndershotA pick of filling deflected from its normal path through the shed and extending unbound over warp ends with which it should have been interlaced
Uneven FillingA filling whose variation of diameter is noticeable enough to detract from the appearance of a weaving fabric
Warp FloatA warp end extending unbound over or under picks with which it should have interlaced
Wavy ClothA term to used describe cloth woven under conditions of varying tension
Wavy Selvage(see selvage)
Wild FillingA piece of loose or stray textile yarn jerked into the shed along with a regular pick of filling

Features of High Speed Rapier Loom

The features of high speed rapier loom is stated below –

  • Weft insertion of the  high speed rapier loom system is joint with air jet picking system,
  • Gabler system rapier may be single sided or double sided for power loom,
  • The machine include on gabler system Draper DSL,Gusken etc which is operating on dewas system include dornier, Gunne, Smit, picanol, Novo pignon SACM , Sommet, Sulzer-Ruti etc,
  • Mechanism  as insertion of double pick to how to make a loom,
  • Mechanism  as insertion of single pick to know how to make a loom,
  • An valuable feature of  high speed rapier loom an industrial machinery is that it works simultaneously inserted in two sheds one above the other for making double plush and certain carpets. [2]
[1] Md. Ferdus Alam, B.Sc. in Textile Engineering, Southeast University, Cell # 1723300700,  Email- ferdus.j@gmail.com
[1] Md Fakhruddin, B.Sc. in Textile Engineering
 

 

 

About Engr. Kh. Mashiur Rahman

He is Garment Business ERP Consultant and Digital Marketing Consultant of several RMG factories. He is certified Echotech Garment CAD Professional-China, Aptech-India, NCC-UK and B.Sc. in CIS- London Metropolitan University, M.Sc. in ICT-UITS. He is also re-seller of several top-level Apparel ERP software companies. Contact- apparelsoftware@gmail.com, Cell# +880 1792525354

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